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, and irene, lost their home so they came over and they stayed with sheridan and his brother at their home, which was not damaged by the fire. so they were married, and he ended up having three daughters and a son. and she was, i think in her early 20s when they married in 1875, and he was 42 or something like that. very happy marriage, and then they all moved to washington when he became general in chief. but he did not have a home life. his life was the army. >> he was there because of the expansion of the north. was it just northerners or was it southerners in the manifest destiny, too? >> they were into it, too. definitely. >> what happened with regard to -- if the south had won. >> i think so. they were into it because the -- before the war because they hoped to get more slave states and keep the balance in congress and everything. but, yeah, there were southerners -- but the great majority, i would say, just because of the way the population was, and the immigrants all came into the northeast. they kind of flowed from the northeast, through the midwest, and on out. but there were som
the great chicago fire. she was just a teenager, and rucker and his wife and irene lost their home. so they came over, and they stayed with sheridan and his brother at their home which was not damaged by the fire. so they were married, and he ended up having three daughters and a son, and she was, i think, in her early 20s when they married in 1875. and he was 42 or something like that. they had a very happy marriage. and then she -- they all moved to washington went he became general in chief. but before that he did not have a home life at all. i mean, his life was the army. yes. >> [inaudible] into the west, and he was out there because of the expansion. was it just northerners, or were the southerners into manifest destiny too? >> oh, they were into it too. yeah, definitely. >> so it would have happened regardless if the south had won? >> i think so. they were into it before the war because they hoped to get more slave statements out there, too, and -- states out there, too, and keep the balance in congress and everything. yeah, there were southerners. but the great majority, i woul
on the screen under the name of irene dunn. [laughter] at my age i have from time to time started thinking about the end of things, and it has occurred to me that when my time does come, i hope to go the way my dear old grandfather did can, quiet ri in his sleep -- quietly in the his sleep, not screaming like the passengers in his car. [laughter] andrew made me laugh more than anybody i've ever met. we all loved andrew, and andrew loved us. my wife, ali mills, was loved so much by andrew, and he said i never dreamed that i would be in the same family with the mother from the wonder years. [laughter] and he just was so full of heart, and the thing i loved most about andrew in terms of his public persona was how people on the left hated him until they met him, and then they started loving him. the new yorker sent a woman out to l.a. where we all lived to do a piece on him, and they did a long piece. she spent ten days, he brought the woman over to our house, and i thought they would do a hatchet job, they did a love letter. she loved him. "the new york times" wrote two major pieces about him in th
. what a naco back to irenic liquidation authority. could it work in cross-border situations? definitive work in cross-border situations? not well heard about 80% are held in the u.k. and is particularly true for institutions like jpmorgan. fixer-upper in 70 countries, but they've got in bulgaria is not systemic. maybe in bulgaria it is. that's a different question. those are afterthought operations. that is why the u.s. in the u.k. are very far wrong and what they call a crisis management group, to resolve the aspect of cross-border banking. is it done? no. should they finish? yes. then i can see her question with a lot more confidence. >> one thing we had to think about really have a talk about is monetary policy has been so accommodative that is distorted risk, returns and it's got to be unwound at some point. that's a great market timing issue and concern, which might be the next crisis. the other thing is what we've all heard today from everybody is dodd-frank is imperfect, but it also has useful elements. it has elements that you think about and how good the days. we need to contin
. into conversations, there has been discussions that perhaps down the road may be enrichment on irene cho can be accepted. perhaps at some point, we don't know when, some of the sanctions, could be lifted. secondly, to president obama's credit, he is no saddam hussein. which means that when saddam hussein made a decision, you either agree with it or you would die if you're inside the iraqi political establishment. saddam did not have to deal with a pesky congress nor did he have to do with an israeli prime minister. as a result, the iranians have the confidence that saddam had the strength to be able to live up to his end of the bargain. that is not the perception that the iranians have, rightly or wrongly, about president obama. can president obama promise the lifting of sanctions, most of these sanctions that really are hurting their rings have gone through congress and now to be lifted if there's a congressional district. can anyone here remember last time congress lifted sanctions in a swift manner? moreover, the principal level that establishes the principle of reciprocity. the idea that
, under the name of irene dunne. at my age i have some from time to time started thinking about the end of things and it has occurred to me when my time does come i hope to go the way my dear old grand father did, quietly in his sleep, not screaming like the passengers in his car. [laughter] andrew made me laugh more than anybody i have ever met. we all loved andrew and andrew loved us. my wife, ali mills, was, loved so much by andrew and he said, i never dreamed that i would be in the same family with the mother from ""the wonder years"". he was so full of heart. the think i love most about andrew in terms his public persona how people on the left hated him until they met him and they started loving him. the "new yorker", sent a woman out to l.a. where we all live to do a piece on him. they did a long piece. she spent 10 days. brought the woman over to our house to meet us. i thought they would do a hatchet job. they did a love letter. she loved him. she couldn't say bad things about him. "new york times" wrote two major pieces about him in the last year of his life and they were both
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6